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Neurodiversity: Executive Function, ProQuest ERIC Articles

Articles from ProQuest's ERIC

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Dyscalculia and Typical Math Achievement Are Associated with Individual Differences in Number-Specific Executive Function

Author: Wilkey, Eric D.    ; Pollack, Courtney; Price, Gavin R.

Publication info: Child Development  Vol. 91, Iss. 2,  (Mar 2020 - Apr 2020): 596-619.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Deficits in numerical magnitude perception characterize the mathematics learning disability developmental dyscalculia (DD), but recent studies suggest the relation stems from inhibitory control demands from incongruent visual cues in the nonsymbolic number comparison task. This study investigated the relation among magnitude perception during differing congruency conditions, executive function, and mathematics achievement measured longitudinally in children (n = 448) from ages 4 to 13. This relation was investigated across achievement groups and as it related to mathematics across the full range of achievement. Only performance on incongruent trials related to achievement. Findings indicate that executive function in a numerical context, beyond magnitude perception or executive function in a non-numerical context, relates to DD and mathematics across a wide range of achievement. [For the corresponding Grantee Submission, see ED601228.]

Links:

Subject: Learning Disabilities; Mathematics Skills; Executive Function; Mathematics Achievement; Children; Early Adolescents; Numbers; Developmental Disabilities; Correlation; Mathematical Concepts; Achievement Tests

Identifier / keyword: Woodcock Johnson Tests of Achievement

Sponsor: Institute of Education Sciences

IES funded: Yes

IES grant or contract numbers: R305A140126

Publication title: Child Development

Volume: 91

Issue: 2

Pages: 596-619

Number of pages: 24

Publication date: March-April 2020

Printer/Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148; http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA; Tel.: 800-835-6770 781-388-8598 ,   Fax: 781-388-8232

Publisher e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com

ISSN: 0009-3920

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: -1

Contract number: R305A140126, R305K050157

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.13194

Accession number: EJ1246015

ProQuest document ID: 2396851933

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2396851933?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2020-05-01

Database: ERIC

Expressive Vocabulary Predicts Nonverbal Executive Function: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study of Deaf and Hearing Children

Author: Jones, Anna; Atkinson, Joanna; Marshall, Chloe; Botting, Nicola; St Clair, Michelle C.; Morgan, Gary

Publication info: Child Development  Vol. 91, Iss. 2,  (Mar 2020 - Apr 2020): 15.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Numerous studies suggest an association between language and executive function (EF), but evidence of a developmental relationship remains inconclusive. Data were collected from 75 deaf/hard-of-hearing (DHH) children and 82 hearing age-matched controls. Children were 6-11 years old at first time of testing and completed a battery of nonverbal EF tasks and a test of expressive vocabulary. These tasks were completed again 2 years later. Both groups improved their scores on all tasks over this period. DHH children performed significantly less well than hearing peers on some EF tasks and the vocabulary test at both time points. Cross-lagged panel models showed that vocabulary at Time 1 predicted change in EF scores for both DHH and hearing children but not the reverse.

Links:

Subject: Executive Function; Deafness; Hearing Impairments; Children; Preadolescents; Nonverbal Communication; Expressive Language; Vocabulary; Language Skills; Predictor Variables

Publication title: Child Development

Volume: 91

Issue: 2

Pages: 15

Number of pages: 15

Publication date: March-April 2020

Printer/Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148; http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA; Tel.: 800-835-6770 781-388-8598 ,   Fax: 781-388-8232

Publisher e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com

ISSN: 0009-3920

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: -1

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.13226

Accession number: EJ1246026

ProQuest document ID: 2396851275

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2396851275?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2020-05-01

Database: ERIC

Parsing Heterogeneity of Executive Function in Typically and Atypically Developing Children: A Conceptual Replication and Exploration of Social Function

Author: Baez, Adriana C.; Dajani, Dina R.; Voorhies, Willa; Parladé, Meaghan V.; Alessandri, Michael; Britton, Jennifer C.; Llabre, Maria M.; Uddin, Lucina Q.    

Publication info: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders  Vol. 50, Iss. 3,  (Mar 2020): 707-718.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Executive function (EF), the set of cognitive processes that govern goal-directed behavior, varies within developmental samples and clinical populations. Here, we perform a conceptual replication of prior work (Dajani et al. in Sci Rep 6:36566, 2016) in an independent sample of typically developing children (n = 183) and children with autism spectrum disorder (n = 104). Consistent with previous work, the latent profile analysis of parent-report EF measures provided evidence for three EF classes, which exhibited differential proportions of diagnostic groups. Additionally, children in the impaired EF group exhibited greater levels of social impairment. These results highlight the heterogeneity of EF ability among clinical and non-clinical populations and the link between EF and social abilities.

Links:

Subject: Executive Function; Children; Autism; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Interpersonal Competence; Correlation

Sponsor: National Institute of Mental Health

IES grant or contract numbers: NIMH5R21MH107045

Publication title: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

Volume: 50

Issue: 3

Pages: 707-718

Number of pages: 12

Publication date: March 2020

Printer/Publisher: Springer; Available from: Springer Nature. 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013; https://link.springer.com/; Tel.: 800-777-4643 212-460-1500 ,   Fax: 212-348-4505

Publisher e-mail: customerservice@springernature.com

ISSN: 0162-3257

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: -1

Contract number: NIMH5R21MH107045, NIMHR01MH107549

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-019-04290-9

Accession number: EJ1243055

ProQuest document ID: 2396849379

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2396849379?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2020-05-01

Database: ERIC

Influences of Executive Function, Language Comprehension, and Fluency on Young Children's Reading Comprehension

Author: Chang, Isabelle

Publication info: Journal of Early Childhood Research  Vol. 18, Iss. 1,  (Mar 2020): 44-57.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which children's executive function predicted their reading comprehension performance. Participants were approximately 18,000 kindergartners in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-2011. The results suggest that individual differences in reading comprehension were influenced by variations in executive function. Cognitive flexibility, inhibitory control, and working memory all accounted for unique variance in reading comprehension. Language comprehension and fluency mediated the relations between children's executive function and their reading comprehension. Working memory accounted for the highest total effect among the three core aspects of executive function. Children's first-grade language comprehension contributed the most indirect effect, while fluency had the reading comprehension. The importance of considering ways to improve executive function, language comprehension, and fluency when implementing reading instruction and what the parents can do to help their children's executive function and reading skills are discussed.

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Subject: Executive Function; Reading Comprehension; Kindergarten; Individual Differences; Cognitive Ability; Inhibition; Short Term Memory; Student Characteristics; Language Fluency; Comprehension; Correlation; Grade 1; Reading Skills

Identifier / keyword: Early Childhood Education Elementary Education Kindergarten Primary Education Grade 1 Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey Woodcock Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability

Education level: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Kindergarten, Primary Education, Grade 1

Publication title: Journal of Early Childhood Research

Volume: 18

Issue: 1

Pages: 44-57

Number of pages: 14

Publication date: March 2020

Printer/Publisher: SAGE Publications; 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320; http://sagepub.com; Tel.: 800-818-7243 805-499-9774 ,   Fax: 800-583-2665

Publisher e-mail: journals@sagepub.com

ISSN: 1476-718X

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles , 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: -1

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1476718X19875768

Accession number: EJ1238872

ProQuest document ID: 2396846989

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2396846989?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2020-05-01

Database: ERIC

 

More Research on Executive Function

Parenting and Children's Executive Function Stability across the Transition to School

Author: Helm, Abigail F.    ; McCormick, Sarah A.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Smith, Cynthia L.; Calkins, Susan D.; Bell, Martha Ann

Publication info: Infant and Child Development  Vol. 29, Iss. 1,  (Jan 2020 - Feb 2020): 19.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: When children transition to school between the ages of 4 and 6 years, they must learn to control their attention and behaviour to be successful. Concurrently, executive function (EF) is an important skill undergoing significant development in childhood. To understand changes occurring during this period, we examined the role of parenting in the development of children's EF from 4 to 6 years old. Participants were mother and child dyads (N = 151). Children completed cognitive tasks to assess overall EF at age 4 and age 6. At both time points, mothers and children completed interaction tasks which were videotaped and coded to assess various parenting dimensions. Results indicated that children with high EF at age 4 were more likely to have high EF at age 6. In addition, results suggested that higher levels of positive parenting across the transition to school promote stability of individual differences in EF.

Links:

Subject: Parenting Styles; Executive Function; Mothers; Video Technology; Individual Differences; School Readiness; Attention Control; Role; Preschool Children; Task Analysis; Self Control; Child Development

Sponsor: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) (NIH)

IES grant or contract numbers: HD049878

Publication title: Infant and Child Development

Volume: 29

Issue: 1

Pages: 19

Number of pages: 19

Publication date: January-February 2020

Printer/Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148; http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA; Tel.: 800-835-6770 781-388-8598 ,   Fax: 781-388-8232

Publisher e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com

ISSN: 1522-7227

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: -1

Contract number: HD049878

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/icd.2171

Accession number: EJ1244388

ProQuest document ID: 2396845392

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2396845392?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2020-05-01

Database: ERIC

Development of Executive Function Skills: Examining the Role of Teachers and Externalizing Behaviour Problems

Author: Goble, Priscilla    ; Nauman, Cambrian; Fife, Katelyn; Blalock, Sarah M.

Publication info: Infant and Child Development  Vol. 29, Iss. 1,  (Jan 2020 - Feb 2020): 21.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: The current study examined the effect of children's positive relationships and interactions with their teachers and the development of executive function (EF) skills in first grade. A primary objective was to examine externalizing behaviour problems (EBPs) as a potential moderator of the link between teacher-child relationships and interactions and EF skills. Participants for the study included 1,364 first-grade children (48.3% female, M age = 7.02 years, 80.4% White) drawn from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. There was limited evidence suggesting the EBP moderates the relation between teacher--child relationship quality and EF skill development in first grade. Specifically, simple slope trends indicated that teacher-child closeness was positively related to gains in sustained attention for typically developing children but negatively related to sustained attention for children exhibiting borderline to clinical levels of EBPs. Implications of the findings are discussed.

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Subject: Teacher Student Relationship; Interaction; Executive Function; Grade 1; Elementary School Students; Behavior Problems; Skill Development; Correlation; Attention; Teacher Role; Student Behavior

Identifier / keyword: Early Childhood Education Elementary Education Grade 1 Primary Education

Education level: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Grade 1, Primary Education

Publication title: Infant and Child Development

Volume: 29

Issue: 1

Pages: 21

Number of pages: 21

Publication date: January-February 2020

Printer/Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148; http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA; Tel.: 800-835-6770 781-388-8598 ,   Fax: 781-388-8232

Publisher e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com

ISSN: 1522-7227

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles , 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: -1

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/icd.2160

Accession number: EJ1244398

ProQuest document ID: 2396845377

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2396845377?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2020-05-01

Database: ERIC

Executive Function and Screen-Based Media Use in Preschool Children

Author: Jusiene, Roma    ; Rakickiene, Lauryna; Breidokiene, Rima; Laurinaityte, Ilona

Publication info: Infant and Child Development  Vol. 29, Iss. 1,  (Jan 2020 - Feb 2020): 13.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: The aim of this study was to explore associations between time spent using various media devices and executive abilities in preschoolers. Participants were 190 children (44.2% female; mean age 58.75 months, SD = 7.27). The Shape School, the Missing Scan and the Head and Feet tasks were administered to children to assess three core executive functions (mental set shifting, working memory, and inhibitory control). Parents provided information on the daily time children spent watching television and using smartphones, tablets, and computers. Parental education was also taken into consideration. Results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed that separate executive abilities were not predicted by use of any type of screen. To conclude, our findings suggest that screen time is not related to executive functions in typically developing low social risk preschoolers who are not overusing screens.

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Subject: Executive Function; Preschool Children; Handheld Devices; Television Viewing; Computer Use; Parent Background; Educational Attainment; Time Management; Inhibition; Short Term Memory

Publication title: Infant and Child Development

Volume: 29

Issue: 1

Pages: 13

Number of pages: 13

Publication date: January-February 2020

Printer/Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148; http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA; Tel.: 800-835-6770 781-388-8598 ,   Fax: 781-388-8232

Publisher e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com

ISSN: 1522-7227

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: -1

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/icd.2173

Accession number: EJ1244403

ProQuest document ID: 2396844877

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2396844877?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2020-05-01

Database: ERIC