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Neurodiversity: Neurodiversity, ProQuest ERIC Articles

About ERIC

The ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) database is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education to provide extensive access to educational-related literature. ERIC provides ready access to education literature to augment American education by increasing and facilitating the use of educational research and information to improve practice in learning, teaching, educational decision-making, and research. ERIC provides coverage of journal articles, conferences, meetings, government documents, theses, dissertations, reports, audiovisual media, bibliographies, directories, books and monographs. From the Proquest web page on ERIC (https://search.proquest.com/eric/productfulldescdetail?accountid=10639).

ERIC Articles on Neurodiversity (Updated 10/29/20)

Documenting Increased Participation of a Student with Autism in the Standards for Mathematical Practice

Author: Lambert, Rachel; Sugita, Trisha; Yeh, Cathery; Hunt, Jessica H.; Brophy, Shayne

Publication info: Journal of Educational Psychology  Vol. 112, Iss. 3,  (Apr 2020): 494-513.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: The Common Core State Standards articulate expectations for student participation in mathematical reasoning, sense making, and discussion. Yet little to no research explores the participation of students with autism in these practices. Drawing on neurodiversity and situated sociocultural theory, this article offers a case study of the mathematics engagement of Oscar, a fifth-grade student with autism, over the duration of 1 school year. Using field notes, videotapes of classroom interactions, student work, and teacher and student interviews, we examined the influence of the classroom activity system on this student's participation in mathematical reasoning and discourse before and after a classroom intervention targeted to improve student engagement by making participation norms more explicit. Prior to the classroom intervention, Oscar did not participate verbally in small-group or whole-group mathematical discussion. After the classroom intervention, along with additional scaffolds such as increased peer accountability and collaborative strategy shares, Oscar increased his verbal and nonverbal participation in both small- and whole-group discussion. Through our year-long study, Oscar shifted from a student who did not speak in math class to one who explained his mathematical thinking in multiple contexts. We call for additional qualitative research in mathematics that seeks to understand the unique participation of students with autism, seeking understanding of how to better include these students in the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

Links:

Subject: Autism; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Student Participation; Mathematics Instruction; Grade 5; Elementary School Students; Mathematical Logic; Intervention; Peer Influence; Cooperative Learning; Group Discussion; Verbal Communication; Nonverbal Communication; Program Effectiveness; Neurological Organization; Problem Solving

Location: California

Identifier / keyword: Elementary Education Grade 5 Intermediate Grades Middle Schools California

Education level: Elementary Education, Grade 5, Intermediate Grades, Middle Schools

Publication title: Journal of Educational Psychology

Volume: 112

Issue: 3

Pages: 494-513

Number of pages: 20

Publication date: April 2020

Printer/Publisher: American Psychological Association; Journals Department, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002; http://www.apa.org; Tel.: 800-374-2721 202-336-5510 ,   Fax: 202-336-5502

Publisher e-mail: order@apa.org

ISSN: 0022-0663

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: -1

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/edu0000425

Accession number: EJ1247135

ProQuest document ID: 2396852205

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2396852205?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2020-05-01

Database: ERIC

Neurodiversity Awareness: Is Malaysia There Yet?

Author: Rahman, Aida A.; Woollard, J.

Publication info: International Journal of Evaluation and Research in Education  Vol. 8, Iss. 4,  (Dec 2019): 676-685.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Scientific research on dyslexia has taken place for the past 50 years during which time arguments on brain deficiency have created tensions between education and cognitive neuroscience researchers. However, clinical research on dyslexia through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has finally revealed that a dyslexic's brain works differently. The findings have finally brought in a new synergy between research in education and cognitive neuroscience and empirically supported the neurodiversity movement. Recently, neurodiversity has been used as a framework for specific learning difficulties (SpLD) justice and to support dyslexia in inclusive education. This qualitative study was conducted to understand the Malaysian mainstream primary school teachers' beliefs about SpLD and the current framework for Malaysian literacy support programme. The data collection is through social media focus group discussion and individual instant messaging interviews with forty-one teachers. The findings reveal that the current programme is built on theories of remediation and that the teachers have exhibited good levels of understanding of remediation, but not yet understand neurodiversity. It makes recommendations with regard to teacher professional development.

Links:

Subject: Foreign Countries; Dyslexia; Equal Education; Learning Disabilities; Neurosciences; Elementary School Teachers; Teacher Attitudes; Attitudes toward Disabilities; Remedial Instruction; Inclusion; Disability Identification

Location: Malaysia

Identifier / keyword: Elementary Education Malaysia

Education level: Elementary Education

Publication title: International Journal of Evaluation and Research in Education

Volume: 8

Issue: 4

Pages: 676-685

Number of pages: 10

Publication date: December 2019

Printer/Publisher: Institute of Advanced Engineering and Science; C5 Plumbon, Banguntapan, Yogyakarta, 55198, Indonesia; http://ijere.iaescore.com/; Tel.: +62-274-4534501 ,   Fax: +62-274-564604

Publisher e-mail: ijere@iaesjournal.com

ISSN: 2252-8822

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: -1

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Accession number: EJ1238367

ProQuest document ID: 2396826862

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2396826862?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2020-05-01

Database: ERIC

"Indefensible, Illogical, and Unsupported"; Countering Deficit Mythologies about the Potential of Students with Learning Disabilities in Mathematics

Author: Lambert, Rachel

Publication info: Education Sciences  Vol. 8,  (2018): 12.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: This paper describes two myths that circulate widely about the potential of students with Learning Disabilities to learn mathematics: (1) that students with Learning Disabilities cannot benefit from inquiry-based instruction in mathematics, and only from explicit instruction; and (2) that students with Learning Disabilities cannot construct their own mathematical strategies and do not benefit from engaging with multiple strategies. In this paper, I will describe how these myths have developed, and identify research that counters these myths. I argue that these myths are the unintended consequences of deficit constructions of students with Learning Disabilities in educational research. Using neurodiversity to frame disability as diversity rather than deficit, I assert that students with Learning Disabilities can learn mathematics to the highest levels, and that these limiting mythologies hold them back.

Links:

Subject: Misconceptions; Learning Disabilities; Mathematics Instruction; Inquiry; Teaching Methods; Direct Instruction; Learning Strategies; Barriers

Publication title: Education Sciences

Volume: 8

Pages: 12

Number of pages: 12

Publication date: 2018

Printer/Publisher: MDPI AG; Klybeckstrasse 64, 4057 Basel, Switzerland; http://www.mdpi.com; Tel.: e-mail: indexing@mdpi.com

Publisher e-mail: indexing@mdpi.com

eISSN: 2227-7102

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 64

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Accession number: EJ1199971

ProQuest document ID: 2228633295

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2228633295?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2019-05-22

Database: ERIC

Enhancing Relaxed Performance: Evaluating the Autism Arts Festival

Author: Fletcher-Watson, Ben    ; May, Shaun

Publication info: Research in Drama Education  Vol. 23, Iss. 3,  (2018): 406-420.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: 'Relaxed performances' allow theatre spectators to experience a non-judgmental environment, featuring adjustments to make them more accessible to a range of audiences. The Autism Arts Festival attempted to develop the idea of relaxed performances further to create an entirely autism-friendly festival in Canterbury. The organisers developed a suite of features to make the festival more accessible, and the suite as a whole was effective at increasing the accessibility of the festival. Moreover, discussions with performers indicate that the festival, as an 'autistic space,' was conducive of both a sense of community solidarity and engagement with the politics of neurodiversity.

Links:

Subject: Theater Arts; Autism; Sense of Community; Social Bias; Audiences; Program Descriptions; Foreign Countries; Feedback (Response); Mixed Methods Research; Criticism; Interviews; Surveys; Observation

Location: United Kingdom (England)

Identifier / keyword: United Kingdom (England)

Publication title: Research in Drama Education

Volume: 23

Issue: 3

Pages: 406-420

Number of pages: 15

Publication date: 2018

Printer/Publisher: Routledge; Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 530 Walnut Street Suite 850, Philadelphia, PA 19106; http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals; Tel.: 800-354-1420 215-625-8900 ,   Fax: 215-207-0050

ISSN: 1356-9783

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: 20

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13569783.2018.1468243

Accession number: EJ1184247

ProQuest document ID: 2101891509

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2101891509?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-09-11

Database: ERIC

 

 

 

More ProQuest Research

Dyslexia: Disability or Difference?

Author: Redford, Kyle

Publication info: Educational Leadership  Vol. 74, Iss. 7,  (Apr 2017): 64-67.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Redford, a veteran 5th grade teacher, addresses the question of whether, in the case of students with dyslexia, "it's time to ditch the disability classification and replace it with more positive language that embraces and appreciates [the condition] as a 'neurodifference' instead." Her answer is no--at least in the current education environment. She argues that while students with dyslexia are often deep and creative thinkers with extraordinary capabilities, they also struggle with foundational academic skills and need the supports and accommodations afforded them by the disability classification (and long sought after by advocates). In particular, such students often in need intensive interventions and accommodations in reading, writing, and test-taking. Redford says that Universal Design for Learning, a framework of supports often used with students with learning disabilities, can be helpful in giving students with dyslexia better access to curricula and alternative ways to demonstrate their learning. The principles of neurodiversity can help destigmatize and demystify conditions like dyslexia but in terms of providing needed academic supports in a school setting, they are largely aspirational.

Links:

Subject: Dyslexia; Symptoms (Individual Disorders); Student Needs; Academic Accommodations (Disabilities); Learning Disabilities; Access to Education; Teaching Methods; Student Diversity; Reading Skills; Barriers; Social Bias

Publication title: Educational Leadership

Volume: 74

Issue: 7

Pages: 64-67

Publication date: April 2017

Printer/Publisher: ASCD; 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714; http://www.ascd.org; Tel.: 800-933-2723 703-578-9600 ,   Fax: 703-575-5400

ISSN: 0013-1784

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 3

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/apr17/vol74/num07/Dyslexia@-Disability-or-Difference%C2%A2.aspx

Accession number: EJ1138107

ProQuest document ID: 1913355042

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/1913355042?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Neurodiversity: The Future of Special Education?

Author: Armstrong, Thomas

Publication info: Educational Leadership  Vol. 74, Iss. 7,  (Apr 2017): 10-16.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: The way special education is carried out in U.S. schools must change. Special education has become weighed down by its emphasis on deficits and disorders: As regular education has opened to new ways of thinking about brain neuroplasticity, growth mindsets, and other innovations, special education has held fast to its diagnostic categories, objectives, and remedial methods. The concept of neurodiversity, Armstrong argues, can be a catalyst for change. He defines neurodiversity as "an understanding that neurological differences are to be honored and respected just like any other human variation, including diversity in race, ethnicity... and so on." Armstrong discusses four key ways a neurodiversity-based approach to teaching kids with learning differences would differ from the traditional approach: (1) neurodiversity offers a more nuanced idea of the origins of "disabilities"; (2) neurodiversity focuses more on finding and maximizing learners' strengths rather than remediating deficits; (3) a neurodiversity approach would stress "workarounds," ways kids can manage their academic work without letting their disability interfere; and (4) rather than "teaching kids about their disorders," we'd teach students about the adaptability of the brain, growth mindsets, and the value of neurological diversity. The article gives suggestions for how to start making this shift happen in special education.

Links:

Subject: Special Education; Brain; Neurological Impairments; Neurology; Teaching Methods; Disabilities; Student Characteristics; Creative Teaching; Student Needs; Barriers; Change Strategies

Publication title: Educational Leadership

Volume: 74

Issue: 7

Pages: 10-16

Number of pages: 7

Publication date: April 2017

Printer/Publisher: ASCD; 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714; http://www.ascd.org; Tel.: 800-933-2723 703-578-9600 ,   Fax: 703-575-5400

ISSN: 0013-1784

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 14

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/apr17/vol74/num07/Neurodiversity@-The-Future-of-Special-Education%C2%A2.aspx

Accession number: EJ1138105

ProQuest document ID: 1913354586

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/1913354586?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Neurodiversity in Education. Trends Shaping Education Spotlight 12

Publication info: OECD Publishing , (2017).

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Diversity in the classroom includes differences in the way students' brains learn, or neurodiversity. Neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) affect increasingly large numbers of students. Education systems must work to meet the needs of these students and ensure that all types of learners thrive at school and beyond.

Links:

Subject: Neurological Impairments; Autism; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Inclusion; Equal Education; Cognitive Style; Learning Disabilities; Individualized Instruction; Student Evaluation; Special Education; Special Needs Students; Standardized Tests; Testing Accommodations; Academic Accommodations (Disabilities); Drug Therapy; Education Work Relationship; Educational Environment; Employment Patterns; Foreign Countries

Location: Belgium Denmark Austria Sweden United States United Kingdom Australia Norway Netherlands Switzerland

Identifier / keyword: Belgium Denmark Austria Sweden United States United Kingdom Australia Norway Netherlands Switzerland

Corporate/institutional author: Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (France), Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI)

Publication title: OECD Publishing

Pages: 12

Number of pages: 12

Publication date: 2017

Printer/Publisher: OECD Publishing; 2, rue Andre Pascal, F-75775 Paris Cedex 16, France; http://www.oecd.org; Tel.: +33-145-24-8200 ,   Fax: +33-145-24-8500

Source type: Reports

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Report, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 37

Subfile: ERIC, Resources in Education (RIE)

Information provider: https://www.oecd.org/edu/ceri/spotlight12-Neurodiversity.pdf

Accession number: ED579681

ProQuest document ID: 2013521329

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2013521329?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Material Voices: Intermediality and Autism

Author: Trimingham, Melissa; Shaughnessy, Nicola

Publication info: Research in Drama Education  Vol. 21, Iss. 3,  (2016): 293-308.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Autism continues to be regarded enigmatically; a community that is difficult to access due to perceived disruptions of interpersonal connectedness. Through detailed observations of two children participating in the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project "Imagining Autism: Drama, Performance and Intermediality as Interventions for Autistic Spectrum Conditions" (2011-2014), we demonstrate how "intermediality" unlocked some of the many and various languages autistic children use, facilitating their self-awareness and agency. We argue for the centrality of creative "material" and intermediate languages, as a bridge between the lived experience of autism, cultures of neurodiversity and practices of education and care.

Links:

Subject: Attention; Puppetry; Photography; Visual Aids; Observation; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Case Studies; Films; Film Production; Teaching Methods; Assistive Technology; Interpersonal Relationship; Empathy; Imagination; Creativity; Art Expression; Questionnaires; Interviews; Statistical Analysis; Diagnostic Tests; Foreign Countries

Location: United Kingdom

Identifier / keyword: United Kingdom

Publication title: Research in Drama Education

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 293-308

Number of pages: 16

Publication date: 2016

Printer/Publisher: Routledge; Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106; http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals; Tel.: 800-354-1420 ,   Fax: 215-625-2940

ISSN: 1356-9783

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: 43

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13569783.2016.1195121

Accession number: EJ1105640

ProQuest document ID: 1826536412

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/1826536412?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Even More ProQuest Research

Valuing Writers from a Neurodiversity Perspective: Integrating New Research on Autism Spectrum Disorder into Composition Pedagogy

Author: Tomlinson, Elizabeth; Newman, Sara

Publication info: Composition Studies  Vol. 45, Iss. 2,  (Oct 2017 - Dec 2017): 91-112.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: This study investigates how individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) approach writing tasks. We draw from the largest sample of autistic individuals to date in our field to argue for the value of understanding ASD writers through the lens of neurodiversity. The neurodiversity approach focuses on autism as a part of human experience and values adaptive techniques, as opposed to dwelling on a cure for ASD. Our research expands and supports neurodiversity theory through the participants' descriptions of their approaches to writing and the techniques they use to communicate successfully with audiences across areas of their lives--in classrooms, workplaces, and their own personal writings. To better address the needs of all students, on the basis of this research, we advocate for an approach to composition pedagogy that incorporates Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and the classical notion of "metis."

Links:

Subject: Autism; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Writing Instruction; Writing (Composition); Neurosciences; Neurological Impairments; Theory of Mind; Writing Strategies; Writing Attitudes; Student Attitudes; Access to Education

Publication title: Composition Studies

Volume: 45

Issue: 2

Pages: 91-112

Number of pages: 22

Publication date: Fall 2017

Printer/Publisher: University of Cincinnati; Department of English, P.O. Box 210069, Cincinnati, OH 45221; http://www.uc.edu/journals/composition-studies.html; Tel.: 513-556-6519 ,   Fax: 513-556-5960

Publisher e-mail: compstudies@uc.edu

ISSN: 1534-9322

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research, 160: Tests/Questionnaires

Number of references: 63

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.uc.edu/journals/composition-studies/issues/archives/fall-2018-45-2.html

Accession number: EJ1159661

ProQuest document ID: 2009555347

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2009555347?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Valuing Differences: Neurodiversity in the Classroom

Author: Rentenbach, Barb; Prislovsky, Lois; Gabriel, Rachael

Publication info: Phi Delta Kappan  Vol. 98, Iss. 8,  (May 2017): 59-63.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: K-12 educators often overlook the needs, talents, and skills of neurodiverse learners, including students with autism, ADHD, and dyslexia. However, while such human differences tend to be misunderstood and even pathologized, there are distinct strengths associated with each unique neurological design. Drawing on their own experiences as students, educators, and researchers, the authors discuss ways in which teachers can empower different thinkers to participate in and contribute to mainstream life, thought, and culture.

Links:

Subject: Elementary Secondary Education; Student Diversity; Neurological Impairments; Student Empowerment; Autism; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Dyslexia; Teaching Methods; Classroom Techniques

Identifier / keyword: Elementary Secondary Education

Education level: Elementary Secondary Education

Publication title: Phi Delta Kappan

Volume: 98

Issue: 8

Pages: 59-63

Number of pages: 5

Publication date: May 2017

Printer/Publisher: SAGE Publications; 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320; http://sagepub.com; Tel.: 800-818-7243 805-499-9774 ,   Fax: 800-583-2665

Publisher e-mail: journals@sagepub.com

ISSN: 0031-7217

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 6

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0031721717708297

Accession number: EJ1139656

ProQuest document ID: 1913353274

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/1913353274?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Dyslexia: Disability or Difference?

Author: Redford, Kyle

Publication info: Educational Leadership  Vol. 74, Iss. 7,  (Apr 2017): 64-67.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Redford, a veteran 5th grade teacher, addresses the question of whether, in the case of students with dyslexia, "it's time to ditch the disability classification and replace it with more positive language that embraces and appreciates [the condition] as a 'neurodifference' instead." Her answer is no--at least in the current education environment. She argues that while students with dyslexia are often deep and creative thinkers with extraordinary capabilities, they also struggle with foundational academic skills and need the supports and accommodations afforded them by the disability classification (and long sought after by advocates). In particular, such students often in need intensive interventions and accommodations in reading, writing, and test-taking. Redford says that Universal Design for Learning, a framework of supports often used with students with learning disabilities, can be helpful in giving students with dyslexia better access to curricula and alternative ways to demonstrate their learning. The principles of neurodiversity can help destigmatize and demystify conditions like dyslexia but in terms of providing needed academic supports in a school setting, they are largely aspirational.

Links:

Subject: Dyslexia; Symptoms (Individual Disorders); Student Needs; Academic Accommodations (Disabilities); Learning Disabilities; Access to Education; Teaching Methods; Student Diversity; Reading Skills; Barriers; Social Bias

Publication title: Educational Leadership

Volume: 74

Issue: 7

Pages: 64-67

Publication date: April 2017

Printer/Publisher: ASCD; 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714; http://www.ascd.org; Tel.: 800-933-2723 703-578-9600 ,   Fax: 703-575-5400

ISSN: 0013-1784

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 3

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/apr17/vol74/num07/Dyslexia@-Disability-or-Difference%C2%A2.aspx

Accession number: EJ1138107

ProQuest document ID: 1913355042

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/1913355042?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Other research

Dyslexia: Disability or Difference?

Author: Redford, Kyle

Publication info: Educational Leadership  Vol. 74, Iss. 7,  (Apr 2017): 64-67.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Redford, a veteran 5th grade teacher, addresses the question of whether, in the case of students with dyslexia, "it's time to ditch the disability classification and replace it with more positive language that embraces and appreciates [the condition] as a 'neurodifference' instead." Her answer is no--at least in the current education environment. She argues that while students with dyslexia are often deep and creative thinkers with extraordinary capabilities, they also struggle with foundational academic skills and need the supports and accommodations afforded them by the disability classification (and long sought after by advocates). In particular, such students often in need intensive interventions and accommodations in reading, writing, and test-taking. Redford says that Universal Design for Learning, a framework of supports often used with students with learning disabilities, can be helpful in giving students with dyslexia better access to curricula and alternative ways to demonstrate their learning. The principles of neurodiversity can help destigmatize and demystify conditions like dyslexia but in terms of providing needed academic supports in a school setting, they are largely aspirational.

Links:

Subject: Dyslexia; Symptoms (Individual Disorders); Student Needs; Academic Accommodations (Disabilities); Learning Disabilities; Access to Education; Teaching Methods; Student Diversity; Reading Skills; Barriers; Social Bias

Publication title: Educational Leadership

Volume: 74

Issue: 7

Pages: 64-67

Publication date: April 2017

Printer/Publisher: ASCD; 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714; http://www.ascd.org; Tel.: 800-933-2723 703-578-9600 ,   Fax: 703-575-5400

ISSN: 0013-1784

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 3

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/apr17/vol74/num07/Dyslexia@-Disability-or-Difference%C2%A2.aspx

Accession number: EJ1138107

ProQuest document ID: 1913355042

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/1913355042?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Neurodiversity: The Future of Special Education?

Author: Armstrong, Thomas

Publication info: Educational Leadership  Vol. 74, Iss. 7,  (Apr 2017): 10-16.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: The way special education is carried out in U.S. schools must change. Special education has become weighed down by its emphasis on deficits and disorders: As regular education has opened to new ways of thinking about brain neuroplasticity, growth mindsets, and other innovations, special education has held fast to its diagnostic categories, objectives, and remedial methods. The concept of neurodiversity, Armstrong argues, can be a catalyst for change. He defines neurodiversity as "an understanding that neurological differences are to be honored and respected just like any other human variation, including diversity in race, ethnicity... and so on." Armstrong discusses four key ways a neurodiversity-based approach to teaching kids with learning differences would differ from the traditional approach: (1) neurodiversity offers a more nuanced idea of the origins of "disabilities"; (2) neurodiversity focuses more on finding and maximizing learners' strengths rather than remediating deficits; (3) a neurodiversity approach would stress "workarounds," ways kids can manage their academic work without letting their disability interfere; and (4) rather than "teaching kids about their disorders," we'd teach students about the adaptability of the brain, growth mindsets, and the value of neurological diversity. The article gives suggestions for how to start making this shift happen in special education.

Links:

Subject: Special Education; Brain; Neurological Impairments; Neurology; Teaching Methods; Disabilities; Student Characteristics; Creative Teaching; Student Needs; Barriers; Change Strategies

Publication title: Educational Leadership

Volume: 74

Issue: 7

Pages: 10-16

Number of pages: 7

Publication date: April 2017

Printer/Publisher: ASCD; 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714; http://www.ascd.org; Tel.: 800-933-2723 703-578-9600 ,   Fax: 703-575-5400

ISSN: 0013-1784

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 14

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/apr17/vol74/num07/Neurodiversity@-The-Future-of-Special-Education%C2%A2.aspx

Accession number: EJ1138105

ProQuest document ID: 1913354586

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/1913354586?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Neurodiversity in Education. Trends Shaping Education Spotlight 12

Publication info: OECD Publishing , (2017).

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Diversity in the classroom includes differences in the way students' brains learn, or neurodiversity. Neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) affect increasingly large numbers of students. Education systems must work to meet the needs of these students and ensure that all types of learners thrive at school and beyond.

Links:

Subject: Neurological Impairments; Autism; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Inclusion; Equal Education; Cognitive Style; Learning Disabilities; Individualized Instruction; Student Evaluation; Special Education; Special Needs Students; Standardized Tests; Testing Accommodations; Academic Accommodations (Disabilities); Drug Therapy; Education Work Relationship; Educational Environment; Employment Patterns; Foreign Countries

Location: Belgium Denmark Austria Sweden United States United Kingdom Australia Norway Netherlands Switzerland

Identifier / keyword: Belgium Denmark Austria Sweden United States United Kingdom Australia Norway Netherlands Switzerland

Corporate/institutional author: Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (France), Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI)

Publication title: OECD Publishing

Pages: 12

Number of pages: 12

Publication date: 2017

Printer/Publisher: OECD Publishing; 2, rue Andre Pascal, F-75775 Paris Cedex 16, France; http://www.oecd.org; Tel.: +33-145-24-8200 ,   Fax: +33-145-24-8500

Source type: Reports

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Report, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 37

Subfile: ERIC, Resources in Education (RIE)

Information provider: https://www.oecd.org/edu/ceri/spotlight12-Neurodiversity.pdf

Accession number: ED579681

ProQuest document ID: 2013521329

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/2013521329?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

Material Voices: Intermediality and Autism

Author: Trimingham, Melissa; Shaughnessy, Nicola

Publication info: Research in Drama Education  Vol. 21, Iss. 3,  (2016): 293-308.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Autism continues to be regarded enigmatically; a community that is difficult to access due to perceived disruptions of interpersonal connectedness. Through detailed observations of two children participating in the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project "Imagining Autism: Drama, Performance and Intermediality as Interventions for Autistic Spectrum Conditions" (2011-2014), we demonstrate how "intermediality" unlocked some of the many and various languages autistic children use, facilitating their self-awareness and agency. We argue for the centrality of creative "material" and intermediate languages, as a bridge between the lived experience of autism, cultures of neurodiversity and practices of education and care.

Links:

Subject: Attention; Puppetry; Photography; Visual Aids; Observation; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Case Studies; Films; Film Production; Teaching Methods; Assistive Technology; Interpersonal Relationship; Empathy; Imagination; Creativity; Art Expression; Questionnaires; Interviews; Statistical Analysis; Diagnostic Tests; Foreign Countries

Location: United Kingdom

Identifier / keyword: United Kingdom

Publication title: Research in Drama Education

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 293-308

Number of pages: 16

Publication date: 2016

Printer/Publisher: Routledge; Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106; http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals; Tel.: 800-354-1420 ,   Fax: 215-625-2940

ISSN: 1356-9783

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: 43

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13569783.2016.1195121

Accession number: EJ1105640

ProQuest document ID: 1826536412

Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/1826536412?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

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