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Neurodiversity: Neurodiversity, ProQuest ERIC Articles

About ERIC

The ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) database is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education to provide extensive access to educational-related literature. ERIC provides ready access to education literature to augment American education by increasing and facilitating the use of educational research and information to improve practice in learning, teaching, educational decision-making, and research. ERIC provides coverage of journal articles, conferences, meetings, government documents, theses, dissertations, reports, audiovisual media, bibliographies, directories, books and monographs. From the Proquest web page on ERIC (https://search.proquest.com/eric/productfulldescdetail?accountid=10639).

ERIC Articles on Neurodiversity

1. Valuing Writers from a Neurodiversity Perspective: Integrating New Research on Autism Spectrum Disorder into Composition Pedagogy

Author: Tomlinson, Elizabeth; Newman, Sara

Publication info: Composition Studies  Vol. 45, Iss. 2,  (Oct 2017 - Dec 2017): 91-112.

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Abstract: This study investigates how individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) approach writing tasks. We draw from the largest sample of autistic individuals to date in our field to argue for the value of understanding ASD writers through the lens of neurodiversity. The neurodiversity approach focuses on autism as a part of human experience and values adaptive techniques, as opposed to dwelling on a cure for ASD. Our research expands and supports neurodiversity theory through the participants' descriptions of their approaches to writing and the techniques they use to communicate successfully with audiences across areas of their lives--in classrooms, workplaces, and their own personal writings. To better address the needs of all students, on the basis of this research, we advocate for an approach to composition pedagogy that incorporates Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and the classical notion of "metis."

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Subject: Autism; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Writing Instruction; Writing (Composition); Neurosciences; Neurological Impairments; Theory of Mind; Writing Strategies; Writing Attitudes; Student Attitudes; Access to Education

Publication title: Composition Studies

Volume: 45

Issue: 2

Pages: 91-112

Number of pages: 22

Publication date: Fall 2017

Printer/Publisher: University of Cincinnati; Department of English, P.O. Box 210069, Cincinnati, OH 45221; http://www.uc.edu/journals/composition-studies.html; Tel.: 513-556-6519 ,   Fax: 513-556-5960

Publisher e-mail: compstudies@uc.edu

ISSN: 1534-9322

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research, 160: Tests/Questionnaires

Number of references: 63

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.uc.edu/journals/composition-studies/issues/archives/fall-2018-45-2.html

Accession number: EJ1159661

ProQuest document ID: 2009555347

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/2009555347?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

2. Material Voices: Intermediality and Autism

Author: Trimingham, Melissa; Shaughnessy, Nicola

Publication info: Research in Drama Education  Vol. 21, Iss. 3,  (2016): 293-308.

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Abstract: Autism continues to be regarded enigmatically; a community that is difficult to access due to perceived disruptions of interpersonal connectedness. Through detailed observations of two children participating in the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project "Imagining Autism: Drama, Performance and Intermediality as Interventions for Autistic Spectrum Conditions" (2011-2014), we demonstrate how "intermediality" unlocked some of the many and various languages autistic children use, facilitating their self-awareness and agency. We argue for the centrality of creative "material" and intermediate languages, as a bridge between the lived experience of autism, cultures of neurodiversity and practices of education and care.

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Subject: Attention; Puppetry; Photography; Visual Aids; Observation; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Case Studies; Films; Film Production; Teaching Methods; Assistive Technology; Interpersonal Relationship; Empathy; Imagination; Creativity; Art Expression; Questionnaires; Interviews; Statistical Analysis; Diagnostic Tests; Foreign Countries

Location: United Kingdom

Identifier / keyword: United Kingdom

Publication title: Research in Drama Education

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 293-308

Number of pages: 16

Publication date: 2016

Printer/Publisher: Routledge; Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106; http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals; Tel.: 800-354-1420 ,   Fax: 215-625-2940

ISSN: 1356-9783

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: 43

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13569783.2016.1195121

Accession number: EJ1105640

ProQuest document ID: 1826536412

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/1826536412?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

3. Assessing Visual-Spatial Creativity in Youth on the Autism Spectrum

Author: Diener, Marissa L.; Wright, Cheryl A.; Smith, Katherine N.; Wright, Scott D.

Publication info: Creativity Research Journal  Vol. 26, Iss. 3,  (2014): 328-337.

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Abstract: The goal of this study was to develop a measure of creativity that builds on the strengths of youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The assessment of creativity focused on the visual-spatial abilities of these youth using 3D modeling software. One of the objectives of the research was to develop a measure of creativity in an authentic learning environment that built on the interests and creative talents of youth with ASD. Traditional creativity tests may underestimate the creativity of youth with ASD because of the tests' constrained nature, such as having a time limit, being limited to paper and pencil, testing in an over- or understimulating environment, and overlooking visual-spatial ability. A random selection of 27 student 3D design projects (out of approximately 100 projects) was assessed using dimensions of fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration. The validity of this assessment was examined by comparing the creativity scores of the 27 projects to the creativity scores given by a team of Google experts (3D designers and software engineers). Results indicated that the scores were significantly correlated for three of the four dimensions of the creativity assessment. There was high inter-rater reliability among coders (M = 0.82) using intra-class correlation (ICC). Results suggest that this assessment process could be used as a visual-spatial creativity measure for youth with ASD, as well as a creativity measure used by employers to determine real-world creative potential in their employees, particularly those with neurodiversity.

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Subject: Autism; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Creativity; Creativity Tests; Spatial Ability; Visual Acuity; Youth; Computer Software; Scores; Interrater Reliability; Coding; Correlation; Measures (Individuals); Elementary School Students; Models; Computer Simulation

Identifier / keyword: Elementary Education

Education level: Elementary Education

Publication title: Creativity Research Journal

Volume: 26

Issue: 3

Pages: 328-337

Number of pages: 10

Publication date: 2014

Printer/Publisher: Routledge; Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106; http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals; Tel.: 800-354-1420 ,   Fax: 215-625-2940

ISSN: 1040-0419

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: 71

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10400419.2014.929421

Accession number: EJ1088920

ProQuest document ID: 1826523279

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/1826523279?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

4. Deficit, Difference, or Both? Autism and Neurodiversity

Author: Kapp, Steven K.; Gillespie-Lynch, Kristen; Sherman, Lauren E.; Hutman, Ted

Publication info: Developmental Psychology  Vol. 49, Iss. 1,  (Jan 2013): 59-71.

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Abstract: The neurodiversity movement challenges the medical model's interest in causation and cure, celebrating autism as an inseparable aspect of identity. Using an online survey, we examined the perceived opposition between the medical model and the neurodiversity movement by assessing conceptions of autism and neurodiversity among people with different relations to autism. Participants (N = 657) included autistic people, relatives and friends of autistic people, and people with no specified relation to autism. Self-identification as autistic and neurodiversity awareness were associated with viewing autism as a positive identity that needs no cure, suggesting core differences between the medical model and the neurodiversity movement. Nevertheless, results suggested substantial overlap between these approaches to autism. Recognition of the negative aspects of autism and endorsement of parenting practices that celebrate and ameliorate but do not eliminate autism did not differ based on relation to autism or awareness of neurodiversity. These findings suggest a deficit-as-difference conception of autism wherein neurological conditions may represent equally valid pathways within human diversity. Potential areas of common ground in research and practice regarding autism are discussed. (Contains 6 tables.)

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Subject: Autism; Parenting Styles; Neurological Impairments; Neurological Organization; Symptoms (Individual Disorders); Identification (Psychology); Medicine; Models; Child Rearing

Publication title: Developmental Psychology

Volume: 49

Issue: 1

Pages: 59-71

Number of pages: 13

Publication date: January 2013

Printer/Publisher: American Psychological Association; Journals Department, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242; http://www.apa.org/publications; Tel.: 800-374-2721 202-336-5510 ,   Fax: 202-336-5502

Publisher e-mail: order@apa.org

ISSN: 0012-1649

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: 72

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0028353

Accession number: EJ1006860

ProQuest document ID: 1413417668

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/1413417668?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

5. First, Discover Their Strengths

Author: Armstrong, Thomas

Publication info: Educational Leadership  Vol. 70, Iss. 2,  (Oct 2012): 10-16.

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Abstract: This article discusses how a neurodiversity perspective can help educators create learning environments in which all students flourish. The basic premise of neurodiversity is that there is no "typical" mental capacity--no "normal" brain to which all other brains are compared--and because this is the case, educators should look at students with autism, ADHD, learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, emotional and behavior disorders, and other disability categories not in terms of their deficits, but primarily in terms of their strengths. By focusing on assets rather than labels, educators in both regular and special education can develop better ways of helping all students succeed. Once they recognize the strengths of students with special needs, educators can start to create positive environments within which they can thrive. By changing from a deficit orientation to a diversity perspective, and by creating positive ecosystems within which students with learning differences can learn according to their strengths rather than their weaknesses, educators can help these students become who they are truly meant to be.

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Subject: Learning Disabilities; Behavior Disorders; Autism; Special Needs Students; Mental Retardation; Educational Environment; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Emotional Disturbances; Student Characteristics; Role Models; Occupational Aspiration

Publication title: Educational Leadership

Volume: 70

Issue: 2

Pages: 10-16

Number of pages: 7

Publication date: October 2012

Printer/Publisher: ASCD; 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714; http://www.ascd.org; Tel.: 800-933-2723 703-578-9600 ,   Fax: 703-575-5400

ISSN: 0013-1784

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 21

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct12/vol70/num02/First,-Discover-Their-Strengths.aspx

Accession number: EJ1002447

ProQuest document ID: 1361843216

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/1361843216?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

6. Neurodiversity: Autism Pride among Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Author: Cascio, M. Ariel

Publication info: Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities  Vol. 50, Iss. 3,  (Jun 2012): 273-283.

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Abstract: The neurodiversity movement takes an identity politics approach to autism spectrum disorders, proposing autism spectrum disorders as a positive "neuro-variation" to be approached only with interventions that assist individuals without changing them. This article explicates the concept of "neurodiversity" and places it within the context of autism spectrum disorders advocacy and treatments. It draws from fieldwork conducted in a midwestern urban center, from June through October 2008, with support groups for parents of children with autism spectrum disorders. Neurodiverse sentiments were identified within these groups, despite the pursuance of treatments to which some neurodiversity advocates might object. Therefore, although neurodiversity has influenced parents of children with autism spectrum disorders in this sample, its role as a medical advocacy group has not been fully realized. This article attempts to place neurodiversity in better conversation with advocates and medical professionals.

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Subject: Autism; Social Support Groups; Mothers; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Neurological Impairments; Parent Attitudes; Urban Areas; Emotional Response; Intervention; Advocacy; Influences; Ethnography; Medical Services; Rehabilitation

Identifier / keyword: United States (Midwest)

Publication title: Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Volume: 50

Issue: 3

Pages: 273-283

Number of pages: 11

Publication date: June 2012

Printer/Publisher: American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; P.O. Box 7065, Lawrence, KS 66044-7065; http://aaiddjournals.org/; Tel.: 785-843-1235 ,   Fax: 785-843-1274

Publisher e-mail: AJMR@allenpress.com

ISSN: 1934-9556

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-50.3.273

Accession number: EJ983961

ProQuest document ID: 1238187261

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/1238187261?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

7. Navajo and Autism: The Beauty of Harmony

Author: Kapp, Steven K.

Publication info: Disability & Society  Vol. 26, Iss. 5,  (2011): 583-595.

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Abstract: With so much unknown about autism, the disability tends to reflect the sociocultural preconceptions people project onto it. The predominant narrative in Western society of autism as a "disease" within the medical model contrasts with the more positive, empowering view of autism as a "difference" in the social model and neurodiversity movement. Society has also discriminated against and disabled the Navajo Native Americans since the arrival of Euro-Americans. Navajos resiliently balance between exercising self-determination within their own nation and adapting to outside society, with a culture that remains remarkably intact. The Navajo thus presented exceptional opportunity for cross-cultural analysis. It suggested that the traditional Navajo social constructs of harmony and beauty, as encompassed by a wellness philosophy called Hozho, better serve the needs of Autistic people than the Western notion of "progress" through science and technology.

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Subject: Navajo (Nation); Autism; American Indian Culture; Social Attitudes; Social Discrimination; Adjustment (to Environment); Cross Cultural Studies; Aesthetics; Wellness; Self Determination; Attitudes toward Disabilities; Cultural Differences

Publication title: Disability & Society

Volume: 26

Issue: 5

Pages: 583-595

Number of pages: 13

Publication date: 2011

Printer/Publisher: Routledge; Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106; http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals; Tel.: 800-354-1420 ,   Fax: 215-625-2940

ISSN: 0968-7599

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 142: Reports - Evaluative

Number of references: 62

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article & id=doi:10.1080/09687599.2011.589192

Accession number: EJ934734

ProQuest document ID: 889930964

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/889930964?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

8. Student Experiences of Neurodiversity in Higher Education: Insights from the BRAINHE Project

Author: Griffin, Edward; Pollak, David

Publication info: Dyslexia  Vol. 15, Iss. 1,  (Feb 2009): 23-41.

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Abstract: The number of students with identified learning differences (LDs) of all kinds is increasing in higher education. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 27 current and previous students with a range of specific LDs by means of semi-structured interviews, using a thematic approach. The findings revealed that participants shared many life experiences and preferences for learning irrespective of their type of LD. Participants generally held one of two views about their identity as "neurodiverse": a "difference view"--where neurodiversity was seen as a difference incorporating a set of strengths and weaknesses, or a "medical/deficit" view--where neurodiversity was seen as a disadvantageous medical condition. The former view was associated with expressions of greater career ambition and academic self-esteem, while the latter view was associated more with processes for obtaining the Disabled Students' Allowance. Many of the participants reported similar experiences in education and with university support; many did not feel adequately supported by their institutions. Recommendations are made for increased awareness training among lecturers and better liaison between university departments. (Contains 1 table.)

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Subject: Higher Education; Student Diversity; College Students; Experience; Student Attitudes; Learning Disabilities; Correlation; Occupational Aspiration; Student Needs; Special Needs Students; Interviews; Student Personnel Services; Equal Education; Foreign Countries; Educational Legislation; Disabilities; Dyslexia; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Asperger Syndrome; Depression (Psychology); Injuries; Cognitive Style; Interpersonal Relationship

Location: United Kingdom

Identifier / keyword: Higher Education United Kingdom

Education level: Higher Education

Publication title: Dyslexia

Volume: 15

Issue: 1

Pages: 23-41

Number ofpages: 19

Publication date: February 2009

Printer/Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; Inc. 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774; http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-DYS.html; Tel.: 800-825-7550 201-748-6645 ,   Fax: 201-748-6021

Publisher e-mail: subinfo@wiley.com

ISSN: 1076-9242

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 143: Reports - Research

Number of references: 30

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dys.383

Accession number: EJ826653

ProQuest document ID: 61914413

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/61914413?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

9. Race, Culture, and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Understanding the Role of Diversity in Successful Educational Interventions

Author: Tincani, Matt; Travers, Jason; Boutot, Amanda

Publication info: Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities (RPSD)  Vol. 34, Iss. 3-4,  (2009): 81-90.

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Abstract: The reported prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has increased dramatically since the 1980s. In response, researchers, educators, and policy makers have sought to develop effective technologies for assessment and intervention. A focus on evidenced-based practices is logical, given significant deficits in language, social interaction, cognition, and adaptive behavior that comprise these conditions. Although critical, a technology of best practices is insufficient without understanding the important role that diversity plays in helping persons with ASD, particularly those with the most severe impairments, to lead fulfilling lives. The aim of the current article is threefold. First, we explore the concept of diversity with particular attention to neurodiversity among persons with ASD. We describe how cultural and linguistic diversity influence identification of students with ASD in special education, with data to suggest that racially diverse students are underrepresented in the autism category. We then examine the educational process with particular focus on the impact of parent and family culture on perception of disability, the influence of diverse family systems on interventions, and the successful interventions for diverse contexts. We conclude with recommendations for culturally competent practice and research. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

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Subject: Autism; Family Environment; Interaction; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Student Diversity; Evaluation Methods; Intervention; Neurological Impairments; Cultural Influences; Language Usage; Special Education; Racial Differences; Interpersonal Relationship; Disproportionate Representation; African American Students; Asian American Students; Hispanic American Students; Alaska Natives; American Indians; White Students; Family Involvement

Publication title: Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities (RPSD)

Volume: 34

Issue: 3-4

Pages: 81-90

Number of pages: 10

Publication date: 2009

Printer/Publisher: TASH; 1025 Vermont Avenue 7th Floor, Washington, DC 20005; http://www.tash.org/publications/rpsd/rpsd.html; Tel.: 202-263-5600 ,   Fax: 202-637-0138

ISSN: 1540-7969

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 142: Reports - Evaluative

Number of references: 66

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.tash.org/publications/RPSD/RPSD.html

Accession number: EJ898502

ProQuest document ID: 762468078

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/762468078?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

10. Autism as Metaphor: Narrative and Counter-Narrative

Author: Broderick, Alicia A.; Ne'eman, Ari

Publication info: International Journal of Inclusive Education  Vol. 12, Iss. 5-6,  (Sep 2008): 459-476.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: In this paper we explore the significance of metaphor and dominant cultural narratives in current autism discourse. We briefly explore the history of metaphor in autism discourse, and outline the contemporary struggle between the culturally dominant metaphor of autism as disease and the emergent counter-narrative of autism within neurodiversity. We argue that metaphor serves very specific purposes in autism discourse, including (1) to create a commonsensical narrative congruence between common understandings of autism and currently dominant notions about its aetiology(ies) or causes(s), and (2) to create a commonsensical narrative congruence between common understandings of autism and currently dominant notions about appropriate responses to or interventions for autism. We argue that the bulk of the support for metaphorically framing autism within a disease model comes from within the non-autistic ("neurotypical" or "NT") community, whereas the bulk of the support for metaphorically framing autism within a neurodiversity model comes from within the autistic community (and is inclusive of some non-autistic allies as well). In exploring these competing cultural narratives, we argue for the crucial import that counter-narrative can play in the process of cultural critique and resistance to ideological hegemony. (Contains 2 notes.)

Links: Link to Full Text

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Subject: Autism; Figurative Language; Cultural Influences; Neurological Impairments; Diseases; Etiology; Intervention; Disabilities; Labeling (of Persons); Public Opinion; Access to Education

Publication title: International Journal of Inclusive Education

Volume: 12

Issue: 5-6

Pages: 459-476

Number of pages: 18

Publication date: September 2008

Printer/Publisher: Routledge; Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106; http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals; Tel.: 800-354-1420 ,   Fax: 215-625-2940

ISSN: 1360-311 6

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 142: Reports - Evaluative

Number of references: 40

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article & id=doi:10.1080/13603110802377490

Accession number: EJ821998

ProQuest document ID: 61925076

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/61925076?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC

11. Neurodiversity

Author: Jurecic, Ann

Publication info: College English  Vol. 69, Iss. 5,  (May 2007): 421-442.

ProQuest document link

Abstract: Increasingly, autistic students are attending college, posing new challenges to writing instructors. In particular, such students may have trouble imagining readers' responses to their texts. Developing an appropriate pedagogy for these students may involve revisiting composition studies' tradition of cognitive research, while not abandoning more recent constructivist theories. People with Asperger's Syndrome, who are my primary concern in this article, are on the less severe end of the autism spectrum; they tend to possess average to above-average cognitive and verbal abilities, while they also exhibit impaired social abilities and the fixed patterns of interest typical of autism.

Links: Link to Full Text

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Subject: Writing (Composition); Verbal Ability; Constructivism (Learning); Asperger Syndrome; Autism; College Attendance; Reader Response; Teaching Methods; Cognitive Ability; Interpersonal Competence; Writing Instruction; Higher Education

Identifier / keyword: Higher Education

Education level: Higher Education

Publication title: College English

Volume: 69

Issue: 5

Pages: 421-442

Number of pages: 22

Publication date: May 2007

Printer/Publisher: National Council of Teachers of English; 1111 West Kenyon Road, Urbana, IL 61801-1096; http://www.ncte.org/journals; Tel.: 877-369-6283 217-328-3870

ISSN: 0010-0994

Source type: Scholarly Journals

Peer reviewed: Yes

Summary language: English

Language of publication: English

Document type: Article, Report, 080: Journal Articles, 141: Reports - Descriptive

Number of references: 60

Subfile: ERIC, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE)

Information provider: http://www.ncte.org/journals/ce/issues

Accession number: EJ776554

ProQuest document ID: 62031597

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/docview/62031597?accountid=10639

Last updated: 2018-08-31

Database: ERIC